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Volunteering in Caerau for the Trelai Park parkrun


Local Kevin Brennan MP recently joined the volunteers who regularly help run the weekly parkrun at Trelai Park.

The event is growing in popularity and starts every Saturday at 9am at the side entrance to Trelai Park.

It's free to take part and all you have to do is register at www.parkrun.com/register.

They're always looking for volunteers and if you would like to help you can email them at trelaipark@parkrun.com.

For further details you can visit: www.parkrun.org.uk/trelaipark.


Kevin Brennan MP is fully behind Unite's campaign to end 'fire and rehire' practices and joined a number of MPs in writing to the Prime Minister to take urgent action to outlaw the controversial tactic.

The TUC found that already one in 10 workers had been threatened with fire and rehire during the pandemic, with that number set to grow dramatically as furlough ends unless the law is changed.

In the letter, in which Mr Brennan was a co-signatory, it says:

“Fire and rehire is spreading through workplaces, with now an estimated one in ten UK workers undergoing a threat to their jobs.

But it is rarely, if ever, implemented as a response to business need. Indeed, one employer attempt­ing to force through cuts to terms and conditions has just recorded record profits.  

“One minister has described fire and rehire as ‘bully boy tactics'. Unless something is done urgently it will only accelerate further putting unnecessary stress and strain on families across the UK.  

“UK workers should have the same protections as workers in other countries. Fire and rehire is out­lawed in much of Europe and it should be no different here.”

Business of the House
22nd July 2021


Kevin Brennan Labour, Cardiff West

On summer reading, may I recommend that Ministers read Members’ correspondence and respond to it? The latest figures show that across Government just 70% of responses are achieved within target. Ironically, the Cabinet Office, which compiles the figures, achieved only 58%, but the prize goes to the Department for Education, which managed to answer a pathetic 17% of Members’ correspondence on time. What can the Leader of the House do to help Members debate how they get timely answers to their correspondence? When will the Education Secretary be carpeted in the headteacher’s office for being the biggest dunce in the Government?

Jacob Rees-Mogg Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
The hon. Gentleman has come up with the best summer reading list of all of us and makes his point well. I am concerned about this issue and have taken it up in Government with the previous Cabinet Secretary and with Ministers. It is a matter of the greatest seriousness that letters should be answered, and answered promptly. I will help any individual Member in getting answers to letters that are overdue. I have had some success with that. I fear that if I were completely overwhelmed by Members asking me to get a response from another Department, that system may not work so well, but, as long as it is a manageable number, I will do my best. I absolutely will take up his point with the Department for Education, because 17% is not where the figure ought to be.

Business of the House
24th June 2021

 
Kevin Brennan Labour, Cardiff West
Further to the question from Mr Mitchell, no one is taken in by the Leader of the House’s sophistry on this subject. Everybody knows that he is seeking to avoid giving the House a meaningful vote on whether it agrees with the Government’s decision temporarily to reduce the amount of aid being sent to the poorest countries in the world. There is no need for him to dilate widely on this; he used to occupy a semi-recumbent position over there and regularly criticised the Executive for exactly this kind of jiggery-pokery. Why does he not come clean with his own side and allow a proper vote—not one rolled up with all such other expenditure in the estimates, but one that would truly meet the test set for him by Mr Speaker?


Jacob Rees-Mogg Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons 
I object to what the hon. Gentleman is saying. Trivialising the estimates does not understand their importance. One of the fundamental things that this House does is approve the expenditure proposed by the Government. It is lost in the mists of constitutional time. It is a debate on the whole of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office’s budget, and it is possible to vote against it. It is a full day’s debate, but I challenge the Opposition again: if they want to debate this so much, we have given them lots of Opposition days, so why have they not used one on it? It is because they do not really want to get this message across to their voters, because it is a policy that has enormous support with the electorate. Our ultimate bosses like this policy. They back this policy and they think it is proportionate under the economic circumstances. The law set out very clearly what the requirements were with the 0.7%: if the target is not met, a statement must be laid before this House. If the hon. Gentleman does not like the law, he should have put down an amendment when the Bill was passed.

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